Mentorship is an instrument of light in journalism. At the Coalition for Women in Journalism, we promote the spirit of stewardship and seeking guidance. It helps. We know and recognize that women journalists come with immense potential to help each other. We are smart enough to know that would mean progress for the whole industry. 

The Coalition for Women in Journalism is the first global network of mentors for women journalists. We have seven chapters in seven countries, and offer help to journalists in five languages. Our network of individuals and organizations bring together the experience and mentorship necessary to help women navigate the industry. 

We offer a peer support network through our mentorship program, in any region or beat. Women facing crisis situations, can be offered professional and psychological assistance. Just reach out.

Our mentors and partners outside the U.S. cover the Americas, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Some of our partner organizations help us execute our goals within the media industries in these regions. 

Would you like to join us in the mentorship revolution? Get in touch.

 
A historical snipet, and some reflection. One of the first women for women support project we know from history. This is an image of the Canadian Women's Press Club that was formed on a Canadian Pacific Railway car carrying 16 women to cover the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. Eight women were francophone, and eight were anglophone. The Press Club served as a powerful vehicle for female journalists in that era — women who did not have the right to vote, who could not hold political office, who were rarely educated beyond high school and for whom marriage and motherhood were deemed the proper path in life.  Young journalists in Canada still feel they need the club. In many parts of the world women journalists are looking to hang on to each other.

A historical snipet, and some reflection.
One of the first women for women support project we know from history. This is an image of the Canadian Women's Press Club that was formed on a Canadian Pacific Railway car carrying 16 women to cover the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904.

Eight women were francophone, and eight were anglophone.
The Press Club served as a powerful vehicle for female journalists in that era —

women who did not have the right to vote, who could not hold political office, who were rarely educated beyond high school and for whom marriage and motherhood were deemed the proper path in life. 

Young journalists in Canada still feel they need the club. In many parts of the world women journalists are looking to hang on to each other.